Control of Congress up for grabs this midterm election

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WASHINGTON (Gray DC) -- Midterm elections are often viewed as a referendum on the White House.
The sitting president's party typically loses seats in Congress in these off years.

Will Republicans meet that same fate tonight, or can they buck the trend?

Democrats need to flip 23 seats to retake control of the House of Representatives after eight years of GOP leadership.

"We're looking at one of the biggest battlefields I've ever seen for the House. Democrats are targeting dozens and dozens [of seats]," said Lisa Hagen, campaign writer for The Hill.

Hagen says it's possible more than 23 House seats will go blue.

"It's really hinging on the battle in the suburbs. We're looking at well-educated voters, female voters who are more moderate and might be frustrated by the president," she explained.

Hagen also points to a change in demographics in traditionally Republican districts in blue states.

The Senate, meanwhile, is totally different story. Ten of the 26 Democratic seats up for re-election are in states President Trump won in 2016. If Republicans picked up all those seats, they could have a 60-member majority, but Hagen says that's not looking likely.

"A lot of these races are tight," said Hagen. "And some of them are even showing Democratic incumbents up."

Voter turnout for midterms is typically lower than a presidential year. But Gray Television polling of likely voters in Florida, North Dakota, and West Virginia shows about 50 percent are more enthusiastic to vote in this election.