Prevent catching a disease from a tick bite

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PANHANDLE, Neb. Ticks can cause issues with humans and animals year round so the Panhandle Public Health District is sharing tips on how you can prevent a disease from a tick bite.

Ticks are more active in the warmer months and bring diseases including Lyme disease, tularemia, and Rocky Mountain spotted fever. If you see a tick on you or your pet, grab tweezers and pull upwards. (Brian Sherrod, KNEP)

Once you get bite by a tick, you risk potential diseases including Lyme disease, tularemia, and Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

Ticks are more active in the warmer months when people are active outdoors.

They live in grassy, wooded areas when people are camping, hiking and gardening.

To help prevent bites for you and your pets,

• Stay on marked trails when hiking and avoid wooded, bushy areas.
• Use EPA-registered insect repellents that contain DEET.
• Check your clothing for ticks after being outdoors.
• Check your own body and pets’ body for ticks.
• Shower within two hours after being outdoors.

Ticks can hide in your ears, waistbands and on the back of your knees.

If you happen to find a tick on your body, use fine-tipped tweezers to grasp the tick as close to the skin as you can then pull upwards.

If you cannot get the head of the tick out of your skin, leave it alone and it should come out itself within a few days.

If you develop a rash or a fever within several weeks of a tick bite, see your doctor.